2018 Selection's Topic-Specific Grant Descriptions

There are 5 topic-specific grants for 6 positions in this year's Selection Announcement:

1. Advanced neuroimaging methods for the study of human cognition (D. Baldauf/J. Jovicich/V. Mazza/C. Miniussi/M. Piazza/L. Turella)

2. Computational methods for longitudinal studies of structural brain connectivity (E. Olivetti, P. Avesani)

3. Neural coding (S. Panzeri)

4. Brain functional connectivity in models of neuropsychiatric disorders (A. Bifone)

5. Computational cognitive neuroscience (S. Panzeri)

6. Embedded systems design for investigating the neural substrates of core perceptual and cognitive functions in infant (E. Farella)

7.  Effective and structural brain connectivity in Alzheimer's disease: a multimodal approach of TMS-EEG and MRI (C. Miniussi)


1. Advanced neuroimaging methods for the study of human cognition (2 positions).
This project will enable the candidate to pursue research on human cognition using advanced methods of neuroimaging (e.g., fMRI, MEG, EEG, TMS) and their integration (multimodal neuroimaging.)  The ideal candidate should have a background in cognitive neuroscience and preliminary experience with neuroimaging methods.

Contacts:
Daniel Baldauf: daniel.baldauf [at] unitn.it
Jorge Jovicich: jorge.jovicich [at] unitn.it
Veronica Mazza: veronica.mazza [at] unitn.it
Carlo Miniussi: carlo.miniussi [at] unitn.it
Manuela Piazza: manuela.piazza [at] unitn.it
Luca Turella: luca.turella [at] unitn.it

 

2. Computational methods for longitudinal studies of structural brain connectivity (1 position).
Diffusion MRI provides indirect information of the anatomical structure of the white matter of the brain. Neurological diseases and brain disorders may introduce alterations in such structures. Additionally, after neurosurgery and cognitive rehabilitation, there may be reorganization of the white matter. The goal of this project is to design computational methods to detect and characterize white matter changes over time, disentangling the intrinsic variability of brain recordings from actual anatomical changes, in order to support neuroscientific and clinical inference. 

Contacts:
Emanuele Olivetti: olivetti [at] fbk.eu
Paolo Avesani: avesani [at] fbk.eu

 

3. Neural coding (1 position).
This project will develop mathematical analysis methods and neural network models for studying neural population coding during cognitive tasks, for studying the neural bases of sensory perception and decision making, and for linking functional to anatomical connectivity with cellular resolution at the neural population level. The ideal candidate will have a background on a numerate discipline and a keen interest in neuroscience and for determining the best theoretical framework to combine recording of neural activity (calcium imaging, electrophysiology, EEG) and intervention on it (optogenetics, TMS).

Contact: Stefano Panzeri: stefano.panzeri [at] unitn.it
 

4. Brain functional connectivity in models of neuropsychiatric disorders (1 position).

Contact: Angelo Bifone: angelo.bifone [at] iit.it

 

5. Computational cognitive neuroscience (1 position).
This project will develop and use methods to study the neural bases of cognition. These may include methods for the analysis of functional imaging or electrophysiological data, or neural network models for the interpretation of neural stimulation experiments.

Contact: Stefano Panzeri: stefano.panzeri [at] unitn.it

6. Embedded systems design for investigating the neural substrates of core perceptual and cognitive functions in infant (E. Farella)

The goal of this project will be the development of a portable electroencephalography system for investigating the neural correlates of core perceptual and cognitive functions in very young infants (0-3 years old), combining a hardware development based on cutting-edge embedded system design and a methodological development based on frequency-tagging experimental paradigms.

Contact: Elisabetta Farella: efarella [at] fbk.eu

7. Effective and structural brain connectivity in Alzheimer's disease: a multimodal approach of TMS-EEG and MRI (C. Miniussi)

Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been defined a disconnection syndrome. Here we aim at establishing the potential of TMS-EEG coregistration, an established tool to study brain connectivity, as marker for diagnosis and of progression in AD, by testing the relationship of TMS-EEG measures with brain network white matter (WM) integrity and patient cognitive decline.

Contact: Carlo Miniussi: carlo.miniussi [at] unitn.it